Neighbors sue oneC1TY developers over blasting

Homeowners, church say dynamiting caused 'significant damage'
May 1, 2015 2:37 PM

Medalogix files suit against Alabama partner

Hospice provider claims Nashville data company infringed on intellectual property
Apr 27, 2015 7:11 AM

Karaoke company strikes back against record companies

Canadian company seeks protection from one suit, dismissal of another
Apr 17, 2015 2:25 PM

Four jump to Waller from Neal & Harwell

Quartet bolsters firm's qui tam practice
Mar 30, 2015 2:43 PM

Opry Mills wins in $200M flood insurance dispute

Chancellor finds for mall against scads of insurers
Mar 18, 2015 11:00 AM

After reversal, Appeals Court affirms $3M judgment against MTSU

Supreme Court overturned reversal, remanded for determination of damages
Mar 17, 2015 1:34 PM

New business court to be introduced in Davidson County

Supreme Court orders creation of pilot project
Mar 16, 2015 12:59 PM

Pinnacle suing PGM Properties principals

Bank says developers owe more than $1M
Mar 16, 2015 6:01 AM

Nashville lawyer wins big judgment for Marvin Gaye relatives

Nashville-based King & Ballow attorney Richard Busch won a $7.4 million judgment for the adult children of the late Marvin Gaye in a copyright-infringement case against singers Robin Thicke and Pharrell Williams for plagiarising Gaye's 1977 hit "Got To Give It Up" for their 2013 chart-topper "Blurred Lines."

Busch called an expert who identified eight distinct elements in "Got To Give It Up" that were copied in "Blurred Lines" and, in his closing argument, implored the jury to recognize that Thicke and Williams "took ['Got To Give It Up'] for themselves."

For their part, Thicke and Williams denied ripping off Gaye. Indeed, Thicke said he hardly contributed to the writing process. Williams said he was inspired by the feel of Gaye and the late 70s, but did not copy the song (rapper TI was a third named defendant, but the jury held him harmless).

Interestingly, the jury never actually heard Gaye's recording, because copyright law at the time of its recording did not allow copyrighting of recorded music, so the judge ruled the jury could only hear it as it was registered with the Library of Congress: as sheet music.

Even with such a potential disadvantage, Busch won.

After trial, he said he would immediately file an injunction preventing sales of the Grammy-winning "Blurred Lines."

Mar 11, 2015 6:45 AM

Former department chair sues Meharry

White professor alleges pattern of discrimination, seeks more than $1.25M
Mar 6, 2015 7:08 AM