Vanderbilt lands $10M grant for autism training

Five-year funding provides educational services to schools
Jun 18, 2015 7:00 AM

Watkins names new president

Eastern New Mexico University dean to replace Meyer, start next month
Jun 16, 2015 2:46 PM

CHS president named to VMI board

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe has appointed David Miller, president and COO of Community Health Systems, to the board of visitors of the Virginia Military Institute. Miller earned his bachelor's degree in economics from VMI before moving on to receive an MBA from the Darden School at the University of Virginia. He joined Franklin-based CHS as a group vice president in 1997 and was promoted to his current roles early last year when the company completed its acquisition of Health Management Associates.

Jun 11, 2015 9:56 AM

Vanderbilt to replace clinical IT systems

Vanderbilt University Medical Center is reviewing its clinical IT systems in an effort to replace key elements, including tools for clinical decision support, nursing documentation and medication management.

McKesson Corp., the vendor for the various applications, has announced it will no longer support those clinical products as of March 2018. Due to the technology's scope, only two contenders are available to replace McKesson's products: Cerner Corp. and Epic Systems Corp. VUMC has tapped Deloitte Consulting to assist with vendor selection.

One of the applications, Horizon Expert Orders, was developed based on technology developed at VUMC and called WizOrder, which was licensed to McKesson in 2001. The application was later back-installed at VUMC.

"We want to understand where we are today with our functionality, and also what our clinicians say we don't have and what we could really use," Mark Ciampa, director of VUMC's HealthIT program management office, said in a statement. "We'll be interviewing physicians, nurses and other staff in the hospital and clinics to help us evaluate current functionality and things that we have today that we really need."

For more, click here.

Apr 27, 2015 7:15 AM

Belmont to house church leadership center

A year-old venture that helps church leaders develop their organizations is relocating to Belmont University from North Carolina. The Center for Healthy Churches is headed by Brentwood native Bill Wilson and is looking to take the reins from the Center for Congregational Health.

The partnership enhances leadership training already going on at Belmont including the Moench Center for Church Leadership, the H. Franklin Paschall Chair of Biblical Studies and Preaching and the Center for Executive Education.

“Our agreement with the Center for Healthy Churches helps extend our focus on developing young leaders and equipping and strengthening churches. It means more opportunities to serve the local church,” said Darrell Gwaltney, dean of Belmont’s College of Theology and Christian Ministry.

Apr 20, 2015 7:18 AM

Cox Enterprises EVP joins VU Board of Trust

Addition is great grandson of three-time Ohio governor, 1920 presidential nominee
Apr 17, 2015 7:02 AM

Former Meharry employee files discrimination, harassment suit

Medical school facing second federal civil rights case this year
Apr 1, 2015 7:20 AM

Ingram Content working on big Chegg deal

Local company to take over warehousing, purchasing
Mar 31, 2015 7:02 AM

VU names Ingram Commons dean

Vanderbilt University officials have named Vanessa Beasley dean of The Martha Rivers Ingram Commons program, its 10-house campus-within-a-campus for freshmen. Beasley came to VU in 2007 to work in the Department of Communication Studies and was director of the Program for Career Development for faculty in the College of Arts and Science from 2008 to 2012. Check out the university's news release here.

Mar 26, 2015 2:17 PM

VU to set up toxicology center with EPA grant

Vanderbilt University researchers are teaming up with some of their peers at the University of Pittsburgh to launch one of three centers designed to develop new toxicology tests and methods. The Environmental Protection Agency is funding the local effort with $6 million over four years.

The primary goal of the new center is to develop a series of 3-D human cell cultures that are heavily wired up with different sensors to record how they respond when exposed to small concentrations of potentially toxic chemicals. The forefront of cell biology is moving away from traditional 2-D culture of a single cell type towards 3-D cell culture of multiple cell types that more closely mimic the microenvironment of particular organs.

Mar 26, 2015 6:58 AM