Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum lands Grammy Gallery

Metro, private donations to pay for interactive exhibit
Mar 26, 2015 12:37 PM

African American museum hits fundraising milestone

Officials with the Nashville-based nonprofit overseeing the planned National Museum of African American Music have announced fundraising initiative Baron Society has surpassed the $1 million milestone.

In 10 months, the organization reached $1.5 million pledged from more than 60 individuals and multi-person entities, according to a release. The initial goal was to attract 40 members pledging $25,000 each over a five-year period.

If it materializes on the site currently home to the 1980s-era Nashville Convention Center, the project is expected to carry a roughly $40 million price tag. A 2017 opening is being targeted. To date, NMAAM has commitments of about $25.5 million and approximately $11 million left to raise.

The current iteration of the nonprofit has evolved since the mid-2000s, at which time a Jefferson Street location was eyed for the museum building.

“As we build development efforts for NMAAM, we receive questions, locally, about support from the African American community,” H. Beecher Hicks, III, (pictured) NMAAM president and CEO, said in the release. “The Baron Society was designed to demonstrate that support and financial commitment to this project. We have been extremely pleased with the responses and expect several more commitments in the next few weeks.”

Because of the response, additional pledges are being finalized, according to LoLita Toney, NMAAM director of development.

“The response received from our effort has been overwhelmingly positive,” Toney, director of development for NMAAM. “Through strategic conversations and by being open to developing long-term relationships, we have gained support from middle Tennessee families and individuals who are committed to investing in this worthwhile project.”

The museum’s creation is dependent upon Spectrum | Emery $400 million redevelopment of downtown Nashville’s former convention center. The team includes, among others, San Diego-based OliverMcMillan.
 

Mar 25, 2015 7:15 AM

Thirty Tigers adds country radio promo group

Local marketing and artist services group Thirty Tigers is branching into country radio promotion with the hiring of four people to capitalize on some recent successes with Chase Rice and Old Dominion. Sarah Skates has details on that plan and more at MusicRow.com.

Mar 24, 2015 10:54 PM

Spirit Music Group acquires StyleSonic

Spirit Music Group has acquired Nashville-based StyleSonic, musicrow.com.

The StyleSonic catalog includes song from Jerrod Niemann, Tim McGraw, Taylor Swift and Dierks Bentley.

Spirit Music Group has offices in London, Los Angeles, Nashville, New York and The Netherlands. Its

Read more here.

Mar 20, 2015 8:45 AM

Franklin-based digital marketing company adds execs

Ribbow Media lures Inkling Collective founders
Mar 19, 2015 11:17 AM

Permit issued for East Nashville Basement space

The owners of popular live music venue The Basement on Eighth Avenue South have landed a permit to rehab space for their Basement East, according to Metro Codes Department documents.

Key Commercial Construction will handle the build-out, with the permit valued at $250,000.

The Basement East will be located in a building located at 917 Woodland St. (See here courtesy of Google Maps.)

Mar 19, 2015 8:30 AM

Adams and Reese adds associate from Bass

Former recording artist Collins also a mentor in EC's Project Music
Mar 17, 2015 7:05 AM

Eric Church sues unknown merchandise counterfeiters

Court gives country star broad power to seize fake goods
Mar 11, 2015 1:23 PM

Nashville lawyer wins big judgment for Marvin Gaye relatives

Nashville-based King & Ballow attorney Richard Busch won a $7.4 million judgment for the adult children of the late Marvin Gaye in a copyright-infringement case against singers Robin Thicke and Pharrell Williams for plagiarising Gaye's 1977 hit "Got To Give It Up" for their 2013 chart-topper "Blurred Lines."

Busch called an expert who identified eight distinct elements in "Got To Give It Up" that were copied in "Blurred Lines" and, in his closing argument, implored the jury to recognize that Thicke and Williams "took ['Got To Give It Up'] for themselves."

For their part, Thicke and Williams denied ripping off Gaye. Indeed, Thicke said he hardly contributed to the writing process. Williams said he was inspired by the feel of Gaye and the late 70s, but did not copy the song (rapper TI was a third named defendant, but the jury held him harmless).

Interestingly, the jury never actually heard Gaye's recording, because copyright law at the time of its recording did not allow copyrighting of recorded music, so the judge ruled the jury could only hear it as it was registered with the Library of Congress: as sheet music.

Even with such a potential disadvantage, Busch won.

After trial, he said he would immediately file an injunction preventing sales of the Grammy-winning "Blurred Lines."

Mar 11, 2015 6:45 AM

In Charge 2015: Music

Mar 8, 2015 11:40 AM