Predators have shown they can win when they don't have Weber

The Nashville Predators typically do just fine without Shea Weber. Eventually.

Since he became a full-time NHL player in 2006-07 the 29-year-old defenseman and team captain has missed time because of injury on eight occasions. Most of the time his absences have been brief but six of those eight absences included a defeat in the first game he missed.

The possibility exists they will be without him again when they play New Jersey on Friday at Bridgestone Arena and Saturday at St. Louis.

Weber did not finish Tuesday’s victory at Winnipeg and did not practice on Thursday. The team called his status day-to-day.

"It's a big deal if he doesn't play," Nashville coach Barry Trotz said, according to the Associated Press. "It's a huge hole we have to fill."

Over the past eight seasons, the Predators’ record without Weber is 21-18-4, although they were winless in three contests earlier this season when he was out with an eye injury.

WITHOUT WEBER
A look at how many games defenseman Shea Weber missed because of injury and how the Predators fared in those contests:

2006-07: 3 games: (1-2-0)
2007-08: 28 games (15-10-3)
2008-09: 1 game (0-1-0)
2009-10: 4 games (2-2-0)
2010-11: 0 games
2011-12: 4 games (3-1-0)
2012-13: 0 games
2013-14: 3 games (0-2-1)
Total: 21-18-4

In 2007-08 he missed 28 of the first 44 games, a 17-game stretch in October-November and an 11-game period in December-January. Those were the only times the Predators won the first game he missed (5-1 vs. Dallas, Oct. 6 and 3-1 at Columbus, Dec. 23) and they eventually went 9-7-1 and 6-3-2, respectively, without him.

Other than that, he has not been sidelined for more than four straight games.

The four he missed in 2009-10 were broken up into a pair of two-game sets, and each time Nashville lost the first but won the second. In 2011-12, the Predators, without Weber, lost 4-1 to Detroit on Dec. 26 then came back with three straight victories (two in a shootout) before he got back in the lineup.

The preference, obviously, is for him to miss as little time as possible, even if it means a bad result at first.