Commissioner, heal thyself

The agency once headed by the current DCS commissioner had some problems:

On March 15, 2010, just nine months before becoming Gov. Bill Haslam’s pick to lead the state’s child welfare agency, O’Day was put on notice that DCS had “concerns for the safety and well-being of custodial youths placed at Child and Family Tennessee.” The nonprofit was a contractor hired by DCS to care for kids in foster care or residential treatment facilities.

DCS suspended all admissions to Child and Family, a step taken only for the most serious agency violations. In the case of Child and Family, those included inappropriately doling out group punishments for the actions of a single youth, missing medication records and a failure to focus on youths’ “needs, strengths and permanence,” among the eight serious findings outlined in a letter from DCS.